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How to do 520 chain & sprocket conversion 1098/1198


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#1 TC996

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 12:34 PM

  • Lift the rear wheel off the ground and unload the rear suspension. I used a Pitbull stand to raise the rear of the bike and then lowered the fixed foot pegs on automotive jack stands. This allowed the rear suspension to be unloaded(full extension).
  • This step is optional- Measure the rear ride height and wheelbase(my preference is to measure the distance from the center of the swing arm pivot bolt to the center of the rear axle). Do this before any changes are made.
  • Remove front sprocket cover. Locate and mark the master link on the chain. Count the number of links if you chain is not stock length(stock length on 1098/1198 is 98 links).
  • With the chain in place, have another person apply the rear brake and stabilize the bike so you can loosen the front and rear sprocket nuts. You will need a hammer and a pin punch to release the locking tab on the front sprocket nut and remove the safety pin on the rear sprocket nut. A 36”(or longer) breaker bar will make this task easier. If you have a pneumatic impact gun then you can do this by yourself.
  • Locate the previously marked master link of the chain and remove the rivet heads. There are a number of suitable tools for this task but I used a die grinder.
  • Remove chain. Once the chain is removed take this opportunity to clean the upper and lower chain guide on the swing arm.
  • Replace the front sprocket and transfer the lock washer. Make sure the new front sprocket is offset to the same direction as the original sprocket. Tighten the retaining nut by hand.
  • Remove the rear sprocket and carrier assembly from the axle.
  • Transfer the carrier and crush drives onto the quick-change assembly, tighten the sprocket retaining nuts and install the assembly on the axle. Tighten the axle nut by hand.
  • Take the new chain out of the package, make sure the master link is in the package, and then cut the chain to your desired number of links.
  • Put transmission in neutral. Engage the links of the new chain onto the rear sprocket and carefully feed the chain to the front sprocket along the upper chain guide. Wrap the chain around the front sprocket and then connect the two ends of the chain with the new master link. Loosening the swing arm hub may make this task easier depending on length of the chain.
  • Press and rivet the master link with the proper tools.
  • Take some slack out of the chain by rotating the swing arm hub.
  • Tighten the front and rear sprocket nuts to factory torque setting. You will need another person to apply the rear brake and stabilize the bike.
  • Bend the locking tab on the front sprocket nut and install the safety pin on the rear sprocket nut. Reinstall the front sprocket cover.
  • Adjustment the chain to factory spec and then tighten the swing arm hub retaining bolts.
NOTE: The sequence and methods of the steps may vary from one mechanic to another. This is the way I have done it, it may not be the best way but was definitely effective.

Tools required:
32mm socket for front sprocket nut
14mm 12-point socket for rear sprocket carrier crush drive nuts
12mm 6-point socket for quick-change rear sprocket retaining nuts
Factory rear wheel nut socket or equivilent
Factory rear chain tension spanner wrench or equlivent
Chain cutter or die grinder or drill
Chain press & rivet kit
1/2"-drive Torque wrench
3/8"-drive ratchet and allen socket set
Small hammer
Pin punch or flat blade screw driver

Torque settings:
Front sprocket nut 186mn
Rear axle nut 230mn
Rear hub retaining bolts 33mn 1-2-1 sequence

Attached Files


Edited by TC996, 09 July 2010 - 02:14 PM.
more details added


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#2 Rhett

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 05:48 PM

Thanks for the write up! :beer

#3 TC996

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Posted 09 July 2010 - 07:14 AM

Rhett said:

Thanks for the write up! :beer

Welcome Rhett!

Here are more photos.

Since the 520 chain & sprokets are narrower than the OEM 525 spec, I have installed a case saver insert(indicated by the red arrows) to protect the engine case.

Attached Files



#4 Diamond Dave

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Posted 05 August 2010 - 01:43 PM

TC996 said:

I have installed a case saver insert (indicated by the red arrows) to protect the engine case.
Do you have a link to show where you bought this part?

Nice write-up TC! Appreciate the information, bud.

#5 Iowa1098s

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 04:44 PM

What it the main benefit of the 520 chain vs the 525 chain? To me, it seems the 525 is a more heavy duty chain that will stretch less, wear longer, and it a better chain. So, please excuse my questioning, I just an wanting to understand the reason for the switch beside the apparent weight savings.

#6 TC996

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Posted 09 August 2010 - 06:05 AM

Diamond Dave said:

Do you have a link to show where you bought this part?

Nice write-up TC! Appreciate the information, bud.

Here you go:
http://www.desmotime...m/product70.htm

#7 TC996

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Posted 09 August 2010 - 06:51 AM

Iowa1098s said:

What it the main benefit of the 520 chain vs the 525 chain? To me, it seems the 525 is a more heavy duty chain that will stretch less, wear longer, and it a better chain. So, please excuse my questioning, I just an wanting to understand the reason for the switch beside the apparent weight savings.

Some people do it to save a few onces. I did it because 520 sprockets have more gearing choices available and much easier to find replacment parts for when I'm at a track. 525 chains & sprockets are more durable, particularly when using a steel rear sprocket. If you are going for longavity, then 525 is the way to go. I change chains at the end of every riding season so its not an issue for me. My experience is that a top-of-the-line 520 chain such as DID ERV3 streches very little(if any at all) even on bikes making 170whp. I have never had a chain failure using 520 ERV3 chain on a number of litre bikes(lubed regularly and I don't intentionally do wheelies).

Edited by TC996, 09 August 2010 - 06:53 AM.


#8 Handyman

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Posted 09 August 2010 - 11:52 AM

I got 20K miles on my 525 chain before I had to change it out...

#9 RRnold

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Posted 09 August 2010 - 06:50 PM

What kind of sprockets are those? Which ratio did you go with?

#10 TC996

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 05:44 AM

rrnold said:

what kind of sprockets are those? Which ratio did you go with?

afam 14/37

#11 Bowells

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Posted 20 September 2010 - 07:55 AM

Is there an advantage to having the front sprocket being 14t and the rear 40t over a front that is 14t and rear 39t?? I am only asking because my 1098 had the 14t i requested for "city driving" but the mechanic suggested to "go up 1 "on the rear also;to 39t.
I want to now get a 1198s and i believe it already comes with a 39t rear.My question is if i do the 14t sprocket in the front again , should i go 1 up again the rear to make it 40 t?
If so is there a noticeable difference (14t/39t to 14t/40t)??

thanks...

#12 TC996

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 09:24 AM

Bowells said:

Is there an advantage to having the front sprocket being 14t and the rear 40t over a front that is 14t and rear 39t?? I am only asking because my 1098 had the 14t i requested for "city driving" but the mechanic suggested to "go up 1 "on the rear also;to 39t.
I want to now get a 1198s and i believe it already comes with a 39t rear.My question is if i do the 14t sprocket in the front again , should i go 1 up again the rear to make it 40 t?
If so is there a noticeable difference (14t/39t to 14t/40t)??

thanks...
To the best of my knowledge all 1098 and 1198 models(base/S/R) come from the factory with 15/38 sprockets.

It is my opinion that dropping 1 tooth from the front sprocket(14/38) is perfect for city type riding for a 1098/1198. Taking off from a stop is super smooth, especially nice taking off up a steep hill! It is also my opinion that gearing shorter than 14/38(such as 14/39 or 14/40) would be too short gearing for these bikes. I came to this conclusion when I was running out of RPM's at corner exits on the track with 14/38. Also, the shorter gear ratio didn't take advantage of the engine's very torquey and relatively narrow powerband. I had to shift gears more frequently than I prefer to...like on a 600cc inline-4 bike.

Anyway, to answer your questions:
1. I do not think there is an advantage from a 40T rear sprocket over a 39T when used in conjunction with a 14T front on a 1098/1198 for city type riding. But you should NOT listen to me. You should have the gearing that feels good to you for your type of riding: If you are happy with the gearing then leave it alone. If you feel that you need to run slightly higher engine RPM in every gear then go with your mechanic's suggestion.

2. I do not think you should go with 14/39 or 14/40 on a 1198 for the reasons stated above. The 1198 is even more torquey than the 1098, and it revs up slower than the 1098. These engine characteristics will be a better match for taller gearing.

3. Most people can feel a difference of 1 tooth change in the rear, but 1 tooth is a small change. For example, if you are running slightly too high rpm in 2nd gear but slightly too low rpm in 3rd gear at a certain speed then 1 tooth may FEEL like a bigger change to you. Also the higher the number of teeth, the smaller difference one tooth will make.

Disclaimer: These are just my opinions assuming that you are using stock size rear tire and stock transmission gear sets.

Edited by TC996, 30 September 2010 - 10:40 AM.
typo


#13 RRnold

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 02:25 PM

TC996 said:


I'm surprised this isn't standard on these bikes!?!

TC996 said:

afam 14/37

How many links did you remove with a -1/-1 setup?

TC996 said:


Anyway, to answer your questions:
1. I do not think there is an advantage from a 40T rear sprocket over a 39T when used in conjunction with a 14T front on a 1098/1198. But you should NOT listen to me. You should have the gearing that feels good to you for your type of riding: If you are happy with the gearing then leave it alone. If you feel that you need to run slightly higher engine RPM in every gear then go with your mechanic's suggestion.

2. No, you should not go with 14/39 or 14/40 on a 1198 for the reasons stated above*. The 1198 is even more torquey than a 1098. Also the 1198 revs slower than a 1098.

3. Most people can feel a difference of 1 tooth change in the rear, but 1 tooth is small change. Also the higher the number of teeth, the smaller difference one tooth will make.

*These are just my opinions assuming that you are using stock size rear tire.

I've read another thread about 40T sprockets issues as well

http://www.ducati.ms...lease-help.html

#14 TC996

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 06:45 PM

RRnold said:

How many links did you remove with a -1/-1 setup?
I did not remove any links. I kept the stock chain length(98 links). The wheelbase increased by 8mm. Which is fine because my wheelbase was shortened 6mm by installing offset triple clamps.

#15 Bowells

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 09:27 PM

thanks for the in-depth answer this helps out majorly!!

#16 Bowells

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 09:28 PM

TC996 said:

To the best of my knowledge all 1098 and 1198 models(base/S/R) come from the factory with 15/38 sprockets.

It is my opinion that dropping 1 tooth from the front sprocket(14/38) is perfect for city type riding for a 1098/1198. Taking off from a stop is super smooth, especially nice taking off up a steep hill! It is also my opinion that gearing shorter than 14/38(such as 14/39 or 14/40) would be too short gearing for these bikes. I came to this conclusion when I was running out of RPM's at corner exits on the track with 14/38. Also, the shorter gear ratio didn't take advantage of the engine's very torquey and relatively narrow powerband. I had to shift gears more frequently than I prefer to...like on a 600cc inline-4 bike.

Anyway, to answer your questions:
1. I do not think there is an advantage from a 40T rear sprocket over a 39T when used in conjunction with a 14T front on a 1098/1198 for city type riding. But you should NOT listen to me. You should have the gearing that feels good to you for your type of riding: If you are happy with the gearing then leave it alone. If you feel that you need to run slightly higher engine RPM in every gear then go with your mechanic's suggestion.

2. I do not think you should not go with 14/39 or 14/40 on a 1198 for the reasons stated above. The 1198 is even more torquey than the 1098, and it revs up slower than the 1098. These engine characteristics will be a better match for taller gearing.

3. Most people can feel a difference of 1 tooth change in the rear, but 1 tooth is a small change. For example, if you are running slightly too high rpm in 2nd gear but slightly too low rpm in 3rd gear at a certain speed then 1 tooth may FEEL like a bigger change to you. Also the higher the number of teeth, the smaller difference one tooth will make.

Disclaimer: These are just my opinions assuming that you are using stock size rear tire and stock transmission gear sets.

Thanks bro...

#17 yehduc

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 08:24 PM

Was wondering what torque spec you used on the nuts holding the sprocket to the quick-change hub?

#18 TC996

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 04:02 PM

yehduc said:

Was wondering what torque spec you used on the nuts holding the sprocket to the quick-change hub?

They are serrated nuts that came with the kit. Torqued to 13 ft-lb as recommended by Drive Systems USA.

#19 yehduc

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 09:50 PM

TC996 said:

They are serrated nuts that came with the kit. Torqued to 13 ft-lb as recommended by Drive Systems USA.

Thanks for the info!

#20 BDuc73

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Posted 01 April 2011 - 05:04 AM

Great post - thanks for all the info!





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